Social Language Goal/Objective Ideas

Given a hypothetical social situation presented that depicts someone potentially being taken advantage of, <STUDENT> will discriminate if the situation is helpful/fair or hurtful/unfair to the individual for 80% of situations presented over 2 measurement periods.

Given hypothetical situations presented to <STUDENT> that are clearly unfair/hurtful to the fictitious character involved, <STUDENT> will describe why the action is unfair and the likely negative outcome the character may experience, for 80% of all scenarios measured over 2 measurement periods

Given a situation where <STUDENT> is processing a situation where he has been reported as being disrespectful by an adult, <STUDENT> will calmly talk about the situation with a teacher and be able to describe his perspective/intention as well as the likely impression he leaves with the adult for 80% of all documented instances overall in a trimester period.

Given a situation where <STUDENT> has the opportunity to initiate with peers in a small group setting (ex:   lunch/recess, small group work time in general education, etc) – <STUDENT> will initiate with peers by gaining their attention by using appropriate personal space, and asking a question or making a comment about a relevant topic, 80% of the time on average as observed/reported by staff over a trimester period

Given actual social situations <STUDENT> has reported being a part of, or staff/parents have reported involving themes of peer attempts to deceive or take advantage of <STUDENT>, he will be able to:

a)      Describe the problem situation

b)     Describe the intention (s) of both himself and the peer(s) involved when processing the situation later with a teacher.

The objective will be met when <STUDENT> is able to demonstrate these critical thinking skills for 75% of situations presented to him during a trimester reporting period.

Given adult examples of statements using various tones of voice, <STUDENT> will identify whether the tone of voice communicates:  a) agreement/respect, b) agreement/disrespect, c) disagreement/respect, or d) disagreement/disrespect with 80% accuracy overall over a trimester of probe opportunities.

Given adult examples of various tone of voice samples, and accompanying non-verbal cues –<STUDENT> will accurately imitate the model provided by the teacher with 80% accuracy as judged by the social skill teacher, over trimester probes.

Given a hypothetical or actual problem solving scenario reported by the student/adult or presented by the clinician, <STUDENT> will demonstrate basic comprehension of cognitive perspectives by:  a) Explain at least one emotion felt by each participant in the scenario, and b) explain the intention/perspective of each participant.  Criteria will be met when <STUDENT> is able to do both listed tasks for 4/5 proposed problem scenarios on 2 separate probes. 

 

Given a conversation with one other peer, <STUDENT> will maintain a topic of conversation of the peer’s choosing for at least 3 conversational turns in 4/5 measured conversations over a 9 week grading period. 

 

Given a small group social conversation, <STUDENT> will ask one question of a peer about their sharing [by imitating the clinician’s cued question OR when cued to the occasion to do so – “___can you think of a question to ask __ about ___?” OR spontaneously] in 4/5 measured conversation over a 9 week grading period.

 

Given an analysis and data averaging of 3 conversations with 1 person, <STUDENT> will have 35-45% of his conversational turns on average be Questions directed toward gaining information about his conversational partner’s thought with the remaining turns be Comments. 

 

Given a social sharing/conversational time, < STUDENT> will share novel news appropriate to the group/context in 3 out of 4 sharing instances as measured in 2 separate months.

 

Given a social sharing/conversation time with 1-2 peers, <STUDENT> will demonstrate joint attention with the group’s conversation by repeating back a peer’s sharing comments when cued to do so in 3 out of 4 sharing instances as measured in 2 separate months, 

 

Given a role play of conversation breakdowns demonstrated by the clinician, <STUDENT>  will identify which “type” of breakdown it was (Non-Acknowledgment, Request for Clarification, Wrong Shift) with 80% accuracy on average over 3 probes. 

 

Given a role play of conversation breakdowns, <STUDENT> will brainstorm how to “repair” the breakdown given choices of “Repetition, Recast, Addition of Content, Reduction of Content”, with 80% accuracy on average over 3 probes. 

 

When in a frustrating situation <STUDENT> will describe his own emotional reactions to their own problems based on their perceived size of the problem in 4/5 measured situations in a small group setting facilitated by an adult.

 

When in a frustrating situation <STUDENT> will describe other people’s emotional reactions to their own problems based on their perceived size of the problem in 4/5 measured situations in a small group setting facilitated by an adult.

 

Given a visual cue, <STUDENT> will describe the 3 parts of play and will regulate their own behavioral reactions during the “set-up” portion of play (choosing token, establishing directions/rules, choosing person to go first) in 2/3 measured game instances. 

 

Given a picture scene, comic strip or story, <STUDENT> will verbally express a plausible perspective/emotion of at least two different characters involved for 4/5 scenarios presented, maintaining this criteria over 3 separate days. 

 

Given a verbal description and visual depiction (cartooning, drawing stick figures) of a hypothetical social conflict,  <STUDENT>  will describe the likely perspectives/intentions and/or feelings of at least 2 persons involved, and be able to do so for 4/5 scenarios presented, maintaining this criteria over 3 separate days. 

 

Given a verbal description and visual depiction (cartooning, drawing stick figures) of an actual social conflict <STUDENT> was involved in, <STUDENT> will describe the likely perspectives/intentions and/or feelings of himself and at least one other person involved, and be able to do so for 4/5 scenarios discussed over a trimester grading period. 

 

Given a topic of conversation, <STUDENT> will list at least 4 initial or follow-up questions she could ask related to the topic, doing so for 4 out of 5 conversation topics presented, as measured by the speech-language pathologist. 

 

Given a sample and average 3 different conversation topics with 2 peers, <STUDENT> will demonstrate turn-taking, topic maintenance and “balance” in <HIS/HER> contribution of the conversation, by taking a range of 30-40% of the total turns <HIMSELF/HERSELF, as measured by the speech-language pathologist.

 

Given a sample and average of 3 different conversation topics with 2 peers, <STUDENT> will have at least 35% of her contributions to the conversation be initial or follow-up questions, rather than comments or non-response, as measured by the speech-language pathologist.

 

Given an actual social scenario that <STUDENT> was a part of, <STUDENT> will self-reflect upon what other peer’s perspectives/thoughts/feelings were toward his own social behavior in three out of five situations discussed with him.

 

Given a hypothetical social scenario picture or role play, <STUDENT> will describe the meanings behind various non-verbal communication signs (facial expressions, body language, tone of voice) in 80% of situations presented on average over 5 probes. 

 

Given an actual social scenario that <STUDENT> was a part of, <STUDENT> will self-reflect upon what other peer’s perspectives/thoughts/feelings were toward his own social behavior given his interpretation of various non-verbal communication signs (facial expression, body language, tone of voice) in three out of five situations discussed with him.

 

Given a unit of figurative language (ex.  Idiom, metaphor, slang, joke), <STUDENT> will explain the meaning [given a contextual cue OR without a contextual cue], in 80% of instances on average given 3 probes during a 9 week grading period.    

 

Given an emotion word or description, <STUDENT> will demonstrate comprehension of that emotion by:  a) naming a synonym, b) explain it’s meaning, and c) indicate a time that they have felt that emotion.  Criteria will me met when <STUDENT> is able to do two of the three listed tasks independently for 4/5 emotions on 2 separate probes.

 

Given a storybook read aloud, <STUDENT> will indicate an emotion felt by a character [and indicate the reason for the emotion] in 4/5 probes in one storybook and maintain this level for 3 books over a 9-week grading period.

 

Given an adult or peer model of various non-verbal cues, <STUDENT> will demonstrate comprehension of such cues by explaining the intent or meaning behind the cue (i.e. facial expression, tone of voice, gesture, body stance) in 4/5 modeled instances over 2 separate probe days,

 

Given an emotion, <STUDENT> will demonstrate comprehension of non-verbal cues by listing at least 2 cues such as, facial expression nuances, tone of voice changes, body stance nuances, and/or gestural cues that would be present for that given emotion.  Criteria will be met when student names 2 non-verbal cues for 4/5 emotions on 2 separate probe days. 

 

Given a clinician model, <STUDENT> will increase expression of non-verbal communication cues by imitate a [facial expression, tone of voice, gesture. body posture] in 4/5 measured instances over 2 separate probe days. 

 

Given a chapter read independently, <STUDENT> will explain at least 2 emotions and reasons for the emotion in that chapter given cue questions by the clinician.  Criteria will be met when <STUDENT> is able to do so independently for four out of five chapters. 

 

Given a small group conversation facilitated by an adult, <STUDENT> will direct his comments or questions to a specific peer by saying their name, visually referencing them and waiting until he receives peer’s reciprocated eye contact for 80% of his comments measured over a week’s time period. 

 

 Given a storybook or an occasion to share personal news in conversation, <STUDENT> will form an expressive narrative that provides:

a)                  adequate background knowledge for his listener (reference to people/characters involved and the time/place of the setting)

b)                 describes a main idea, central theme, or conflict-resolution

c)                  uses transition vocabulary (i.e.  “after that”, “then”, “in the end”, etc.)

d)                 is a cohesive, sequential story containing adequate detail

Criteria will be met when all aspects are provided in four out of five measured narratives as judged by the speech-language pathologist.

 

Given a list of 10 common idioms/proverbs, metaphors, or social slang, <STUDENT> will explain the figurative, or “social” meaning for 80% of the terms, on average when probes on 3 separate occasions

 

Given an activity or assignment <STUDENT>participated in, <STUDENT> will be able to describe two positive aspects of the experience in 100% of instances as judged by observations/impressions by IEP team members by the next review date. 

 

Given an experience that was reported or observed as stressful for <STUDENT>, he will be able to describe the cause or belief system that caused his stress in 90% of instances as judged by observations/impressions by the IEP team members by the next review date. 

 

Given structured language lessons aimed at teaching the understanding and use of mental state terms (think, remember, believe, want, know, feel, guess, means, wish, pretend), <STUDENT> will answer questions about a character or person’s mental state/perspective including a mental state term in each answer for four out of five questions, maintaining this level of accuracy over 3 separate probe days. 

Organization Goal/Objective Ideas

Given an adult cue to “clean his desk” and providing visual signs for 3-5 categories (i.e.  trash, take home, file in a folder, keep in desk, etc.) , <STUDENT> will be able to sort loose papers into appropriate piles independently in three out of four measures occasions.

When <STUDENT> is transitioning between classes, he will prepare and take with his the necessary belongings from one classroom to another with 1 or less prompts from an adult on 4 out of 5 occasions as measured by the staff observations.

 

Given a visual cue and coaching experiences with an adult, <STUDENT> will learn and apply a strategy to sort and organize his desk to a teacher’s judged satisfaction for 3 out of 4 measured weeks at the time of his next IEP review in 4/09.   

 

Given a visual cue and coaching experiences with an adult, <STUDENT> will write all required homework assignments for a given day in his planner, gather the materials required, bring them home, for 4 out of 5 days measured during a one week period and maintain this progress over 2 weeks at the time of his next IEP review in 4/09.

 

Given completed homework assignments, <STUDENT> will independently bring the assignment back to school AND  turn it in, for 4 out of 5 days measured during a one week period and maintain this progress over 2 weeks at the time of his next IEP review in 4/09.

 

Given a multi-part and/or longer term assignment, <STUDENT>  will participate in adult guided planning of a prioritized schedule to complete the project and then follow through with the proposed steps for 3 out of 4 projects presented in ___  grade.

 

Written Language Support Goal/Objective Ideas:

 

Given an open-ended writing assignment, <STUDENT> will be able to brainstorm at least 3 ideas with guiding questions from an adult in three out of five instances as measured by his IEP team.

Given a specific written language assignment, <STUDENT> will be able to complete the details of a graphic organizer with guiding adult questions in three out of five instances as measured by his IEP team

Given a specific writing topic, <STUDENT> will be able to brainstorm at least 3 details independently to support the topic in three out of five instances as measured by his IEP team

Given a specific writing topic and a completed graphic organizer, <STUDENT> will be able to verbally express/describe his topic in an expressive verbal narrative prior to writing the piece in his classroom.  Criteria will be met when he is able to do this for three out of five instances as measured by his IEP team.

5 responses »

  1. I love this post. It has many great ideas! I am also an SLP, and found some good goal ideas to adapt for a student I serve.

    My question is: for the organizational goal ideas, how are those LANGUAGE goals? I can certainly see how they might be important, but I don’t see how they are either speech- or language-related.

    • Hello Ms. Peterson! Thanks for your kind words! Yes, you are right – the organizational goal ideas are not Language goals – I ended up just tossing the few objectives I had there. In my work world, I don’t really do very much traditional SLP work, I work more on Social/Emotional skills – so the objectives just kind of end up on a long list all together. :)

  2. Hello and thanks for sharing all of this great information! Do you use or have you created a social language rubric or checklist in your district? If so, would you be willing to share? I am in the process of updating our district’s rubric and would love input from others working with students with social communication issues.

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